Spinal stenosis is a condition in which the spinal canal narrows. When this happens, pressure builds up within the spinal canal, which causes the spinal cord to constrict or narrow. As a result, the spinal column bends backward or back as well as into an unnatural position. If left untreated, front-line treatments such as surgery are unable to relieve the pain and damage caused by severe spinal stenosis.

There is no known cause of spinal stenosis; it is an idiopathic (unpredictable) disease. Read on to learn more about how it affects us and how to identify its signs and symptoms so you can get the help you need sooner rather than later.

What Is Spinal Stenosis? 

Spinal stenosis is a condition in which the spinal canal narrows. When this happens, pressure builds up within the spinal canal, which causes the spinal cord to constrict or narrow. This causes the spinal column to bend backward or back as well as into an unnatural position. This condition is commonly called spinal stenosis, but other nicknames include narrowing of the canal, spinal stenosis, and spinal stenosis.

How Common Is Spinal Stenosis? 

Spinal stenosis is a very common condition affecting 1 in 5 people at some point in their lives. The most common age to develop symptoms is 30-40 years. However, the disease can appear at any age. The most common causes of spinal stenosis are diseases of the vertebral column and the surrounding nerves, as well as high blood pressure (hypertension).

Another theory is that increased pressure in the lower leg veins leads to leg Hilbert syndrome, which is characterized by leg spasms.

What Symptoms Does Spinal Stenosis Often Have?

The most common symptom is pain that occurs in the low back or buttocks. The pain may be constant or occur only occasionally. Another common symptom is weakness or stiffening of the legs and feet. There may be a sensation of pressure in the back and/or leg when the patient walks.

Treatment Options For Spinal Stenosis 

Treatment of spinal stenosis varies depending on the cause. In some cases, the cause can be treated with medications. A common medication for spinal stenosis is hysterectomy, which is when the ovaries, Fallopian tubes, and/or uterus are removed. Depending on the cause of your stenosis, other treatments may be tried first to see if they help.

These could include surgery to decompress the spine, drugs to treat high blood pressure, or sometimes a combination of both.

Long Term Effects Of Treating Spinal Stenosis 

Depending on the age of the patient, the severity of the symptoms, and the availability of appropriate treatment, the effects of treating spinal stenosis may never be fully realized. As people get older, their spinal column becomes less flexible and can cause cartilage, bone, and muscle damage. This can result in permanent spinal cord damage or paralysis. These rare but serious complications are why many experts recommend surgical decompression for patients with severe spinal stenosis.

Bottom Line 

Spinal stenosis can be complicated by other medical conditions such as high blood pressure (hypertension), kidney disease, diabetes, and heart disease. If left untreated, spinal stenosis can cause severe damage to your spine and may even lead to paralysis.

To prevent this from happening to you or someone else close to you, you must know about all of its signs and symptoms so you can get help sooner rather than later. To learn more about Spinal Stenosis – check here!